Become a Health and Fitness Professional

If you love to work out, you’ve probably wondered about a career as a personal trainer, a nutritionist, small group trainer, or some other career as a health and fitness professional. Health and fitness professionals get paid to do something they love to do anyway. They get to help other people get fit, too, and work among other fit people who know how rewarding it can be to sculpt your body with cardio, weights, and sheer endurance.

A Career As A Personal Trainer

Personal trainers are in great demand as more and more people realize they get a more efficient workout and a better overall fitness experience when they train with a health and fitness professional. Most people need a weekly or twice-weekly session with a personal trainer to help them set their fitness goals, work toward achieving those goals, and then finally accomplish them. A health and fitness professional gets to lead people on that journey, and they get an amazing feeling of accomplishment when their clients achieve their goals.

Don’t Apply Unless You Like Variety

There’s no such thing as a typical day for a health and fitness professional, because working as a personal trainer means you will probably work several part-time jobs at once. One day you might work in an office for a few hours, then teach a group spinning class, then go back to the office, then back to the gym to coach a private client through a workout, review a weight loss client’s food journal, and give a therapeutic massage. And the next day could be spent doing something entirely different.

A career as a health and fitness professional is ideal for someone who doesn’t like being tied to a desk from 9 to 5. As a personal trainer, the harder you are willing to work, the more money you can earn. Hard-working health and fitness professionals build an established clientèle as clients spread the word, and they can charge more for their services as they build a reputation among their peers.

Health and Fitness Professional Certifications

Certification is available through a variety of standards-setting bodies in the health and fitness profession. Examples of common certifications are: the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist certification from the National Strength and Conditioning Association; a Personal Trainer certification from the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America; and a fitness instructor certification from the National Association for Fitness Certification.