Maintaining Muscles After an Exercise Interruption

Once you’ve incorporated working out into your daily routine, you’ll exercise to maintain the muscles you’ve built through hard work. Use the tips below to avoid common causes of muscle disuse that can result in loss of muscle.

Realize that loss of muscle probably happens faster than you think. For muscles you use frequently, you can see a difference in size and strength after disuse for a number of days. Most research indicates that after several weeks there will be a significant loss of muscle size and strength. Maintaining the look you’ve worked to get should be a constant motivational tool for you to use to stick with your exercise routine.

Unavoidable disuse of your muscles can come from a variety of reasons. If you are away from your gym or your routine has changed, consider using free weights or some fairly inexpensive buys that you can use at home when you have time.

There is some emerging research that if your exercise routine for muscle building is interrupted, you can actually help maintain the muscles you’ve built by working on a different part of your body. For instance, injured weight lifters who were unable to lift for a period of time have been known to help maintain their bodies during a several weeks long period of time by doing leg and torso exercises.

If you are facing challenges to doing your muscle building exercises from pain and it’s resulting drain on your motivation, try doing less intense muscle building exercises. Sometimes. overdoing muscle building exercises can result in pain and lack of motivation to continue. Try lightening up or reducing the number of reps and then gradually building your way back up.

If you’re accustomed to doing one kind of muscle building exercise and you cannot do that exercise, consider whether you can still work on the same muscle group using a machine in the gym rather than weights to maintain your muscles.

Changing the way you work specific muscle groups can help you maintain muscles and variety in your workouts.

If your schedule for exercise is no longer working, figure out why you are not getting your exercise done. Whether it’s a change in schedule you cannot control such as work or school or a seasonal change, don’t stick to a schedule that’s not working but instead, immediately adjust your schedule.

It’s easier to figure out how to fit 45 minutes into a different time of day than it is to stop exercising for a period of time and then try to find 45 minutes in your day for exercise.

Muscle memory should encourage you not to give up if you’ve had a period of muscle disuse. Muscle memory is used to describe that your muscles will come back after a period of disuse once you’ve formed them in the first place.

There are a variety of circumstances that can lead to muscle disuse and loss of muscle. Use the tips above to maintain the muscles you build.